Time for a change…

The moment i’ve been dreading… but GTW64 really does need updating/modernizing and i’m going to have to start tackling the inevitable, so it may as well be now.  With around 8,000 – 10,000 pages, it’s not going to be particularly easy in my free time to convert this beast… but as with any redevelopment of old pages its for the best.  It was a rather long train journey to York and a lot of daydreaming which ignited some enthusiasm to take on the task.  🙂

As well as various improvements to design, removal of deadwood and better structuring of pages… i’m also having some frantic programming/logic spats to produce a few functions which I can use to convert the bloody thing across to the new template I devise.  I have a few ideas which should work in theory – in maybe a 2 or 3 step approach 🙂

Hmmm… a dynamic news page, improved A-Z navigation, RSS feeds, AJAXed elements on the front page… but after all the hard work 🙂

No PES6 on the standard XBOX… :(

Right… which ba****d decided that the new Pro Evolution Soccer game shouldn’t also be released on the standard Xbox? 

With a supported release list consisting of the 360, PS2, DS, PSP and PC, i’m slightly narked off that they’ve decided to avoid the old xbox altogether!  Considering that probably more people still have the old Xbox compared to the 360 because they cannot afford one yet… this decision is a little screwed (And the 360 version pretty much looks like a standard Xbox game too).

So that means i’ve got to wait another 5 years until 360’s are about £20 in Game until I can play the bloody thing 😦 … PES5 it is then…

The Retro Gaming rise

It only seems like not so long ago when I was watching the slow dwindling death of the great Commodore 64, but it is sadly just over 10 years now since the machine's last commercial magazine breathed its last (Commodore Format – 1995).  Although I had an Atari 2600 and Vic 20 way after they were commercially obsolete,  it was into 1996 that still being a C64 user classed me as a "Retro Gamer" (Or "Sad Tosser",  as many were affectionately known in the early beginnings).

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